Pterygium Surgery

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Pterygium surgery is a procedure used to remove a pterygium, which is a noncancerous growth on the eye. Pterygia are benign growths that can occur on the conjunctiva (the clear membrane that covers the front of the eye) and can cause symptoms such as redness, irritation, and vision problems if left untreated.

There are two main types of pterygium surgery:

  • Excisional pterygium surgery: This procedure involves removing the entire pterygium, which is a noncancerous growth on the eye. The surgery is performed under local or general anaesthesia and involves making a small incision to remove the pterygium and then closing the incision with sutures or other methods. Excisional pterygium surgery may be recommended for people who have a pterygium that is causing symptoms or affecting vision.
  • Conjunctival autograft surgery: This procedure involves removing only a portion of the pterygium and replacing it with a small piece of healthy conjunctiva taken from another part of the eye. The surgery is performed under local or general anaesthesia and involves making a small incision to remove the pterygium, taking a small piece of healthy conjunctiva from another part of the eye, and then using it to replace the removed tissue. Conjunctival autograft surgery may be recommended for people who have a large or rapidly growing pterygium or for those who are at a high risk of developing pterygia due to exposure to UV radiation or other factors.

Both types of pterygium surgery are performed to remove a pterygium, which is a noncancerous growth on the eye. The specific steps of the surgery and recovery time will depend on the type of procedure being performed and the individual patient’s needs. It is important to follow the post-surgery instructions provided by the eye doctor to ensure a successful recovery.


PROCEDURE

Here is a general overview of the steps involved in pterygium surgery:

  • Preparation: Before the surgery, the ophthalmologist will perform a thorough eye exam to assess the size and location of the pterygium and determine the best surgical approach. The ophthalmologist will also discuss the risks and benefits of the surgery with the patient and obtain their informed consent.
  • Anaesthesia: Pterygium surgery is usually performed using local anaesthesia, which numbs the eye and surrounding area. The ophthalmologist may also use a sedative to help the patient relax.
  • Excision: The ophthalmologist will make an incision in the conjunctiva and carefully remove the pterygium using specialised instruments. If necessary, the ophthalmologist may also remove a small amount of underlying corneal tissue to ensure a smooth and even surface.
  • Grafting: After removing the pterygium, the ophthalmologist will place a thin strip of healthy conjunctival tissue (called a conjunctival graft) over the area where the pterygium was removed. This helps to prevent the pterygium from growing back and helps to restore the natural shape of the eye.
  • Closure: The ophthalmologist will close the incision with fine suture threads and may place a protective shield over the eye to prevent the patient from rubbing or touching the surgical site.
  • Recovery: After the surgery, the patient will be given instructions on how to care for the eye and manage any discomfort or swelling. The ophthalmologist will also schedule follow-up visits to monitor the patient’s progress and address any concerns.

It’s important to note that pterygium surgery is a relatively quick and straightforward procedure, but it’s important to follow the ophthalmologist’s instructions for care and follow-up to ensure the best possible outcome.


 

POST SURGERY INSTRUCTIONS

It’s important to note that pterygium surgery is a relatively quick and straightforward procedure, but it’s important to follow the ophthalmologist’s instructions for care and follow-up to ensure the best possible outcome.

Some common post-surgical instructions include:

  • Avoiding activities that could cause eye irritation, such as swimming or showering,
  • Wearing sunglasses to protect the eye from sunlight and wind
  • Using artificial tears to keep the eye moist
  • Use any prescribed eye drops or ointments as directed.

 

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